Message from SCEN: Mapping Chinese Study

 

 

Our friends at SCEN have asked SELMAS colleagues to raise awareness of this interesting survey – please seek it out and participate if you can.

 “Mapping Chinese Study” in partnership with the Confucius Institute.

Letters have been sent to every headteacher in Scotland..

Your help with this important survey would be greatly appreciated.

SELMAS workshop with Alan McLean

Alan McLean,  Chartered Psychologist and author of ‘The Motivated School,’ has offered to run a free workshop for the SELMAS tribe based on his recent work on developing self reflection for teachers, leaders and learners. Details and registration are available on the eventbrite link for the workshop. Please book early to avoid disappointment!

Our BIG Ideas from Changing Futures 2017

Flickr Photo: Big Idea by moore.owen38 – CC BY

Participants at our annual conference were treated to a range of talks, discussions and challenges around equity and education of young people on the margins of our system. Over the course of the day, everyone was invited to share a ‘Big Idea’ describing a reflection, action, or intention that was generated at the conference, and here they all are!

Our Big Ideas

o Every child in school needs a mentor with whom they feel connected

o Would changing the school holiday system help to support the most vulnerable, with emphasis on the development of a more holistic approach to education?

o Key components of success:

– notice and be noticed

– hope

– kindness

– breaking the cycle

– resilience

– empathy

– compassion

– local action

o How do we upskill teachers to practically and effectively support behaviour management?

o Recruitment drive to place well qualified , motivated staff in schools

o End the private school system

o John Swinney didn’t mention the responsibilities and contribution that parents/carers must assume at the earliest stages of a child’s life to get success. Is it conceivable that in years to come these vital people will be equipped to make that vital contribution?

o Regardless of SIMD or free school meal entitlement, there are more emotionally vulnerable pupils in our schools. We need counsellors to support these individuals and the budget to do it

o A one year “Working with Families” element of every undergraduate course where police, Social Workers, Education, Health, the Voluntary sector, Leisure, etc all learn together!! We train professionas separately then expect them to be holistic

o Relationships make a difference – small acts of kindness like smiling, welcoming families at school gate, asking, “How are you?”

o Restructuring of education – a move away from age and stage towards what young people need/want to be taught at a time that suits them.

o Upskilling parents to support their child

o Resilience

o Building trust

o Holistic support from birth

o Mental health practitioner in schools

o Has anyone closed the gap? How did they do it?

o How can we be creative and strategic in Edinburgh with attainment funds?

We need more family support workers in our schools and be as focused on how children/young people experience school and not just what they learn. Are they included, cared for and believed in?

o More training on mental health awareness and the impact it has on children and young people

o Does the Government see/feel that increased pressure on schools in terms of publishing standardised test results could conflict with the opportunities to be creative and courageous with pupil equity funding?

o If no more money, then adults spending time, building relationships. Fewer leading lessons – class sizes?

o Most adults who have had adverse childhood experiences say that they need 1:1 support from a trusted adult in school. As a teacher it frustrates me that specialised supports are not readily available and are usually services that are first to be cut when saving budgets,

o Too much/too little time testing? S4-s6 spend one third of their time doing exams, but literacy/numeracy declining?

o Scottish pilots – Pilrig or others? Starting school aged 7, more nursery instead?

Annual Conference 2017: Jamie’s reflections

 

The first in a series of reflections from some participants at our annual conference, Changing Futures, on Thursday 2nd February 2017. More to come! Jamie is a youth and community worker with the Spartans Community Football Academy – a new type of school that’s about a whole lot more than football! Find out more on this link, or contact Spartans directly – details below.

p1040332

 

The day kicked off with a review of the ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) Study, which looked at the impact of ACE experiences on the child and how this impacts in later life. Some examples of this are:

–       Children who suffer ACE’s but have someone to talk to are

less likely to suffer substance abuse and/or crime issues.

–       Children who suffer ACE’S are likely to suffer the consequences of these later in life.

–       Children with 4 or more ACE’s are 32 times more likely to have difficulties with learning.

 

We heard the stories of two volunteers, who have both had ACE’s, who have now turned their lives around – one who spent significant time in a mental health institute and the other who is a recovered heroin addict. These young people are now volunteers from the Turn Your Life Around.

 

The woman who had previously been in a mental institute (amongst several other issues) has now set up her own social enterprise called Real Talk: Storytelling for Mental Wellbeing.

The second volunteer is also now working with a charity called Aid and Abet.

It was particularly interesting to hear the story of Tracy Berry from Forthview Primary School, who is the Family Support Teacher. Her sole job is to engage and build rp1040336elationships with the parents of pupils at the school. Eileen Littlewood, headteacher at Forthview, says Tracy’s success has “literally saved lives”. She spoke a lot about the importance of helping the parents and the evidence that points towards this directly helping young people in education.

 

I particularly enjoyed about hearing from two Care Experienced Campaigners from Who Cares? They described their experiences of living in the care system and how they believe it  can be improved.

 

John Carnochan – an “interested bystander” spoke at length about how he believes the education system can be improved – in particular proposed that children shouldn’t start school until they are 7.

 

 

Jamie Tomkinson

Youth and Community Worker

 

The Spartans Community Football Academy

94 Pilton Drive, Edinburgh EH5 2HF

0131 552 7854

www.spartanscfa.com

@Spartans_CFA

#hereforgood

Annual Conference: “Changing Futures: Believing in our young people.”

BOOKING NOW OPEN

Following last year’s highly successful conference in the Caves, on the theme of “Equity and Aspiration in Education”, booking is now open for this year’s event.

The theme will be “Changing Futures: Believing in our young people” chosen by the SELMAS Committee to continue the focus on issues related to the educational experiences of those young people whose needs are not being met by our current system. As always we have signed up a number of spirited and challenging speakers to stimulate discussion and reflection.

These will include:
John Swinney MSP, our Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills who will outline current Government strategies designed to “Close the Gap.”
Mairi Breen, headteacher of Braehead Primary School who will describe how her teachers are making a real and lasting difference to children in their school who are living in poverty.
John Carnochan who as a senior police officer worked for many years in some of the most deprived communities in Scotland where the levels of poverty and deprivation were usually matched by a sense of hopelessness and disconnection from society.
Cathy McCulloch, Co-Director of the Children’s Parliament which works with children in the context of family, school and community. The Parliament connects children with each other, with adults, with their communities and allows them to influence the development of better services for children.
Sarah-Jane Linton and some of the young people from Who Cares? Scotland which is a national voluntary organisation, working with care experienced young people and care leavers across Scotland.
As always the Conference aims to offer stimulating and creative thinking around this key issue for all educators, and an opportunity to engage with others in thought-provoking discussion.

The venue is the Radisson Blu Hotel, 80 High Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1TH and the date is February 2nd 2017

Book via eventbrite: http://bit.ly/SELMAS020217
This conference is supported by and in partnership with SCEL, the Scottish College for educational Leadership
SCEL

Brains Trust 3: the Outsiders

We have been quiet on the blog for a while, but we are back in business and very excited about our next event which we are delighted to share with you here: Brains Trust 3: the Outsiders. bt3

In partnership with Polmont Young Offenders’ Institute and with the support of Braes High School, Falkirk we warmly invite you to our discussion forum on:

Wednesday 9th November

at Braes High School, Falkirk

4.30-6.30pm

This Brains Trust will build on our recent seam of work on social justice issues, and offers a platform for the voices of  ‘the Outsiders’: the children on the outside margins of our education system, who slip through our fingers often into downward spirals of offending, poverty and harm.

Speakers from Polmont Yong Offenders’ Institute, social work and schools for at-risk young people will offer a brief insight into the challenges they face and the work they do in supporting young people in their care. This will be the starting point for our discussion; contributions from audience are strongly encouraged!

Speakers include:

Charlie Kelly, psychologist at Polmont YOI

Eileen Cumming, Kibble Education and Care Centre

David Noble, Senior Teacher at Hillside School in Aberdour, Fife. Hillside is a residential school for boys with social, emotional and behavioural needs. David is co-founder and host of Radio Edutalk.

Gillian Maxwell, social work.

If you would like to attend this Brains Trust, please register for your FREE TICKET via this eventbrite link

Don’t delay – these events have proven extremely popular in the past. Coffee and Tea will be available on arrival.

Brains Trust – eh??!

What is Brains Trust? For those of you who’ve been before, you’ll remember that these events are quickly organised, pop-up style discussions which arise in response to interest, or as a result of collaborative work we have been doing, or possibly in getting to grips with recent events or policy announcements. This one could be said to represent all three of these stimuli!

Wikipedia has more information on the origins of the term: we like the allusion to a prized body of knowledge or expertise in a given field.This is our aim with Brains Trust – to give space for the discussion of a topic of interest, and hear from expert voices, who might be outside  mainstream channels of communication.

We very much look forward to seeing you on November 9th.

Unlocking Leadership and Management Potential in Different Contexts

An account of the BELMAS Conference (8th – 10th July 2016) by SELMAS convenor, Margaret Alcorn

 

For several years SELMAS has maintained a relationship with our sister organization BELMAS. This year, as in past years the BELMAS Committee invited a member of SELMAS to attend the annual Conference. After discussion at our committee it was agreed that I should attend on behalf of our organization

 

The conference was very different in scale, audience and atmosphere to our own annual event.  A total of 180+ delegates, almost exclusively drawn from academic circles, gathered for two intense days with 3 keynotes and a total of around 50 different sessions to choose from. The mood was very positive as many delegates connected with familiar faces, or indeed with those previously known only through social media. A significant proportion of the attendees (around 25%) were from overseas. This offered lots of new insights and different perceptions to emerge in discussions.

 

Day one started with a description of the work of the “RIGS”, the research interest groups which offer Belmas members an opportunity to share research, inquiry and knowledge in particular areas. Also on day one, two sessions were offered and I attended a roundtable discussion on “Unlocking leadership and management potential through a joint secondary/HEI partnership”. My second choice was “A key to inspired post-graduate leadership learning in regional Australia”

 

Day 2 started with Professor Stephan Huber of the Institute for the Management and Economics of Education at the University of Teacher Education in Zug, Switzerland who spoke about, “School Leadership Practices and Health”.  The second keynote of the day was from Philip Hallinger, an internationally recognised Asia based scholar, who addressed the issue of “Accelerating the Development of a Global Knowledge Base in Educational Leadership and Management”.  A further 3 sessions left us ready for the Banquet Dinner that evening.

 

The keynote on Day 3 was much more familiar to SELMAS people. Our very own Sheila Laing from East Lothian talked about “School Justice Leadership in Different Scottish School Contexts”. She took as her theme the Lao Tze quote, “Go to the people, live with them, start with what they have, build with them, and when the deed is done, the mission accomplished, they will say, “We have done it for ourselves”.

 

So – a very busy and intense learning experience, offering me lots of new learning. The atmosphere was friendly and informal, however although there were a few sessions which described joint HEI/practitioner projects, the focus was overwhelmingly on academic research. Lots more information about the conference can be found here.