Risk and Change: The Challenge of Leadership

6 February 2018

The Merchants’ Hall, Frederick Street, Edinburgh. £80

SELMAS aims to support, encourage and provoke mature conversations in areas of immediate relevance and interest to educational leaders, and the 2018 conference will deliver on this ambition.

This is our latest conference, and offers a timely debate on leadership in the light of current governance reviews – not to be missed!

Our keynote speakers, Lesley Riddoch and Kate Robinson, will test and challenge received wisdom, as will our practitioners who represent all sectors of Scottish education, and as will Louis Moore, who will remind us what it is to be young and enterprising. The day will be chaired by Jay Helbert who has recently taken up post as headteacher in two rural schools after a successful secondment as lead practitioner at SCEL. Keir Bloomer will sum up the day and contribute his observations, which are invariably thought provoking!

 

The venue is a bonus: the remarkable Merchants’ Hall in central Edinburgh, where ‘Art and Architecture have combined to create a building of grace and distinction’.

 

The cost is an added bonus: at £80 we have managed to reduce the cost by £10 from last year, thanks in part to our sponsorship once again from the Scottish College for Educational Leadership.

 

Book your place on eventbrite now!

 

Please note that if, in booking through Eventbrite, you ask to pay by invoice, you should either undertake to pay personally or, if paying through your authority, you must supply a purchase order number for invoicing. To pay by invoice, you must order your tickets and checkout, THEN SELECT ‘pay by invoice’ IN THE OPTIONS AT PAYMENT METHOD.

 Full programme can be viewed here.

Speakers include:

Jay Helbert: Experienced headteacher who has overseen and coordinated a range of leadership programmes including Collaborative Middle Leadership, Towards Headship and Into Headship

 

Lesley Riddoch: is one of Scotland’s best known authors, commentators and broadcasters. She is best known for broadcasting with programmes on BBC2, Channel 4, Radio 4 and BBC Radio Scotland, for which she has won two Sony speech broadcaster awards.

 

Kate Robinson: is Head of Strategic Operations of HundrED, a two-year think and do tank taking an extensive look into the future of K-12 education. An official part of Finland’s centenary of independence in 2017, HundrED interviewed 100 global thought leaders, created 100 case studies of innovative education happenings worldwide, and trialled 100 new experiments in schools across Finland.

 

Louis Moore: is 14 years old and attends Firrhill High School. He is a keen cyclist and is a member of the Edinburgh Road Club. He enjoys being in his school soul band and plays guitar and cornet. He also runs a business called Louis’ Eggs.

 

Keir Bloomer: is an independent education consultant. As a member of the review group which wrote “A Curriculum for Excellence”, he has been closely involved with curriculum reform and recently chaired the Higher Order Skills Excellence Group. He now undertakes curriculum and professional development work.

 

Contact for information:

Bob Cook

Secretary (SELMAS)

bobcook.selmas@outlook.com

07823 335350

The Child Outside the System: SELMAS Forum 2017 by Jay Helbert

 

This is a guest post from Jay Helbert of SCEL. Jay chaired this year’s forum and also wrote this interesting reflection about his impressions of it – thanks on two counts, Jay, from your friends at SELMAS.

This year’s forum took place at St George’s School, Edinburgh with a focus on the child outside the system.  This was my first time at a SELMAS forum and as chair, I took this as an opportunity to challenge those in attendance to be provocative, think creatively and be brave in their conversations and beyond.  This is not to say I think teachers and education leaders are fearty or faint of heart.  In fact to do the very jobs we do requires great doses of fortitude, courage and resilience.  Rather the challenge was to use the forum as a space to imagine and think beyond the system.

We were joined at the forum by a number of innovative thinkers who, more importantly are also innovative doers.  First of all, Paul Blackwell, of the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service told us of how a chance conversation with a colleague in Police Scotland led to him tackling the issue of gang violence and anti-social behaviour.  This is a wonderful example of what can be achieved when people think beyond the traditional and prescribed parameters of one’s role or agency to create sustained change.  Paul’s message was clear and reflected what was to become a theme of the forum:

“Be the person who brings change about, often it starts with you.”  His philosophy of developing solutions with gang members rather than delivering solutions to them, or worse doing things to them is an example of genuine engagement.

The second speaker of the night was Fiona McKenzie, a former music teacher who now runs Centre Stage Communities Ltd, an organisation that uses the arts (and food) to engage people of all ages – current members range from 3 weeks to 106 years old.  Fiona’s talk achieved that rarest of things by having people laughing one moment and choked up the next.  This wasn’t mere ‘edutainment’ though.  Fiona discussed her team meetings where, when new ideas are discussed, staff are encouraged to ask, “What’s the best that can happen?”.  This take on an old question shifts the emphasis to encourage people to imagine a preferred future and then set about making it happen.

He drew a circle that shut me out –

Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout.

But love and I had the wit to win:

We drew a circle that took him in!

–          Outwitted by Edward Markham

 

Fiona was followed by Ian MacMillan, an experienced leader from the financial industry and third sector.  Ian is a non-executive director and chair of Cyrenians, a charity that re-engages those who are excluded, from education, employment or society. Ian was very honest about the fact that teachers and school leaders face a wide range of challenges, from bureaucratic demands, through to the changing nature of curricula and assessment arrangements.  He did, however encourage us all to remember the passion we have for education and continue to kindle the spark that glows within.

“You can’t light the spark in others of it’s not burning brightly within – the greatest thing a teacher does is light a spark, create a trigger moment which creates passion, confidence and allows learners to be free.”

Ian shared his learning from David Marquet’s experiences as a submarine commander when he turned USS Santa Fe from the worst rated ship in the US Navy, into the best.  The key messages can be found in this inspirational and short video clip.

Our final speaker of the night was Gillian Hunt, who reminded us of some stark statistics about the number of young people who leave school without a ‘positive destination’ or more worryingly without a sustained positive destination that enable independent living and positive life experiences.  Many children leave school at 16, but moany of these have disengaged by time they are in second year.  Again Gillian was clear that the majority of young people are engaged in school and are served well by schools, however she is seeking a solution for those to whom school is perhaps not the most conducive environment for learning.  Inspired by Newlands Junior College, Gillian is working with a range of partners from the public, private and third sectors to establish a junior college in Edinburgh.

The forum finished with a very lively panel session where we explored the question – should we have to leave the system to bring about real change?  This led to some deep discussion about the definition of ‘the system’ (are we not all the system?), the power of Mavericks (should we subvert the rules if we know it is the right thing to do?  If so what risks do we take?) and how any individual can change such a vast system (one lone actor can seem like a nut, but when followers join, you have a movement).

“We but mirror the world.  All of the tendencies present in the outer world are to be found in the world of our body.  If we change ourselves then the tendencies in the world will change.”  Mohandas Gandhi.

Throughout the night, I was reminded of an analogy my first head teacher, used to use; some people are like thermometers – they are good at telling you it’s too cold.  Others are like thermostats – they figure out that it’s too cold and then do something about it.

It’s up to you folks.  Are you a thermometer or a thermostat?

 

Personal Note: This blog is a personal reflection of the night as experienced through my eyes and ears.  The beauty of SELMAS forum is that because of the structure and wonderful people present, every single person will have had a unique experience – it would be great to hear yours.

 

 

SELMAS Annual Forum – Thursday, May 11th, 2017

SELMAS Annual Forum 2017

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The Child Outside the System

The SELMAS Forum this year is being held as usual at St George’s School, Garscube Terrace, Edinburgh EH12 6BG  on Thursday 11 May, 6.00-9.00pm, with the unchanged but much appreciated formula of good food, good wine and stimulating, challenging speakers.

We are delighted that:

  • Paul Blackwood, Station Manager with the Scottish Fire and rescue Service
  • Fiona McKenzie of Cenrtrestage in Kilmarnock
  • Ian Macmillan, CEO of the Cyrenians
  • Gillian Hunt, educator,

have all agreed to contribute, and the event is being chaired by

  • Jay Helbert, Lead Specialist at the Scottish College for Educational Leadership/ – an all star line up!

Cost is £38

To find out more, and to book your place click here

PS – You can pay online or by invoice. Don’t forget to select the ‘pay by invoice’ option in the dropdown menu when you get to payments and follow the instructions.

I look forward to seeing you there

Message from SCEN: Mapping Chinese Study

 

 

Our friends at SCEN have asked SELMAS colleagues to raise awareness of this interesting survey – please seek it out and participate if you can.

 “Mapping Chinese Study” in partnership with the Confucius Institute.

Letters have been sent to every headteacher in Scotland..

Your help with this important survey would be greatly appreciated.

SELMAS workshop with Alan McLean

Alan McLean,  Chartered Psychologist and author of ‘The Motivated School,’ has offered to run a free workshop for the SELMAS tribe based on his recent work on developing self reflection for teachers, leaders and learners. Details and registration are available on the eventbrite link for the workshop. Please book early to avoid disappointment!

Our BIG Ideas from Changing Futures 2017

Flickr Photo: Big Idea by moore.owen38 – CC BY

Participants at our annual conference were treated to a range of talks, discussions and challenges around equity and education of young people on the margins of our system. Over the course of the day, everyone was invited to share a ‘Big Idea’ describing a reflection, action, or intention that was generated at the conference, and here they all are!

Our Big Ideas

o Every child in school needs a mentor with whom they feel connected

o Would changing the school holiday system help to support the most vulnerable, with emphasis on the development of a more holistic approach to education?

o Key components of success:

– notice and be noticed

– hope

– kindness

– breaking the cycle

– resilience

– empathy

– compassion

– local action

o How do we upskill teachers to practically and effectively support behaviour management?

o Recruitment drive to place well qualified , motivated staff in schools

o End the private school system

o John Swinney didn’t mention the responsibilities and contribution that parents/carers must assume at the earliest stages of a child’s life to get success. Is it conceivable that in years to come these vital people will be equipped to make that vital contribution?

o Regardless of SIMD or free school meal entitlement, there are more emotionally vulnerable pupils in our schools. We need counsellors to support these individuals and the budget to do it

o A one year “Working with Families” element of every undergraduate course where police, Social Workers, Education, Health, the Voluntary sector, Leisure, etc all learn together!! We train professionas separately then expect them to be holistic

o Relationships make a difference – small acts of kindness like smiling, welcoming families at school gate, asking, “How are you?”

o Restructuring of education – a move away from age and stage towards what young people need/want to be taught at a time that suits them.

o Upskilling parents to support their child

o Resilience

o Building trust

o Holistic support from birth

o Mental health practitioner in schools

o Has anyone closed the gap? How did they do it?

o How can we be creative and strategic in Edinburgh with attainment funds?

We need more family support workers in our schools and be as focused on how children/young people experience school and not just what they learn. Are they included, cared for and believed in?

o More training on mental health awareness and the impact it has on children and young people

o Does the Government see/feel that increased pressure on schools in terms of publishing standardised test results could conflict with the opportunities to be creative and courageous with pupil equity funding?

o If no more money, then adults spending time, building relationships. Fewer leading lessons – class sizes?

o Most adults who have had adverse childhood experiences say that they need 1:1 support from a trusted adult in school. As a teacher it frustrates me that specialised supports are not readily available and are usually services that are first to be cut when saving budgets,

o Too much/too little time testing? S4-s6 spend one third of their time doing exams, but literacy/numeracy declining?

o Scottish pilots – Pilrig or others? Starting school aged 7, more nursery instead?

Annual Conference 2017: Jamie’s reflections

 

The first in a series of reflections from some participants at our annual conference, Changing Futures, on Thursday 2nd February 2017. More to come! Jamie is a youth and community worker with the Spartans Community Football Academy – a new type of school that’s about a whole lot more than football! Find out more on this link, or contact Spartans directly – details below.

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The day kicked off with a review of the ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) Study, which looked at the impact of ACE experiences on the child and how this impacts in later life. Some examples of this are:

–       Children who suffer ACE’s but have someone to talk to are

less likely to suffer substance abuse and/or crime issues.

–       Children who suffer ACE’S are likely to suffer the consequences of these later in life.

–       Children with 4 or more ACE’s are 32 times more likely to have difficulties with learning.

 

We heard the stories of two volunteers, who have both had ACE’s, who have now turned their lives around – one who spent significant time in a mental health institute and the other who is a recovered heroin addict. These young people are now volunteers from the Turn Your Life Around.

 

The woman who had previously been in a mental institute (amongst several other issues) has now set up her own social enterprise called Real Talk: Storytelling for Mental Wellbeing.

The second volunteer is also now working with a charity called Aid and Abet.

It was particularly interesting to hear the story of Tracy Berry from Forthview Primary School, who is the Family Support Teacher. Her sole job is to engage and build rp1040336elationships with the parents of pupils at the school. Eileen Littlewood, headteacher at Forthview, says Tracy’s success has “literally saved lives”. She spoke a lot about the importance of helping the parents and the evidence that points towards this directly helping young people in education.

 

I particularly enjoyed about hearing from two Care Experienced Campaigners from Who Cares? They described their experiences of living in the care system and how they believe it  can be improved.

 

John Carnochan – an “interested bystander” spoke at length about how he believes the education system can be improved – in particular proposed that children shouldn’t start school until they are 7.

 

 

Jamie Tomkinson

Youth and Community Worker

 

The Spartans Community Football Academy

94 Pilton Drive, Edinburgh EH5 2HF

0131 552 7854

www.spartanscfa.com

@Spartans_CFA

#hereforgood