Invitation to SELMAS members for the launch of the leadership in Scottish Education Newtwork

lisenYou are cordially invited to join us for the official launch of the network which will take place at the University of Glasgow,  5.00-7.00pm in R433, St Andrew’s Building on Tuesday, 2nd June. Gillian Hamilton, CEO of the new Scottish College for Educational Leadership, will discuss ‘The Scottish College for Educational Leadership – vision, progress and challenges of supporting a research informed profession.’

You are warmly invited to attend this event – please register at https://www.eventbrite.com/d/united-kingdom–glasgow/lisen/. Please forward this communication to any colleagues whom you think might be interested in attending the event or joining the network (I have attached a leaflet and a membership form). Membership of the network is open to non-SERA members although we would clearly encourage colleagues to join SERA.

Best wishes,

Dr Joan Mowat LiSEN Co-convenor, University of Strathclyde
Dr Margery McMahon LiSEN Co-Convenor, University of Glasgow

Leadership blog post from John Tomsett’s “This much I know about….” series

Leadership blog post from John Tomsett’s “This much I know about….” series

We’ve been a bit quiet on the SELMAS blog over the summer, but there are exciting events coming up – not least our annual conference in November where Matthew Syed and Ollie Bray will both be sharing their wisdom – but to get us started again here is an honest account from John Tomsett’s wonderful blog of tried and tested leadership behaviours and responsibilities in the face of results pressure, and pressure not in a good way! Hope you enjoy it and see the relevance, even though the context is clearly different. More coming soon.

Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders

An interesting TEDtalk with questions for young women coming into employment, and maybe some for school leaders too. Some provocative questions and assertions, e.g., -Success and likeability are positively correlated for men and negatively correlated for women. What do you think?